34 Flowers That Hummingbirds Love – Lots of Great Choices to Grow!


hummingbird approaching a hibiscus flower

By Erin Marissa Russell

Looking to add flowers that hummingbirds love to your garden? You can turn your garden into a hummingbird’s paradise with plants from our list below. The plants that attract hummingbirds tend to be as vibrant and dramatic as the hummingbirds themselves. You’re likely to love these garden additions just as much as the hummingbirds do.

azalea bush blooming

Azalea

Azaleas come in a range of sizes to fit any garden. Dwarf azaleas can be found that max out at three feet tall, while heirloom azaleas can stretch up to 20 feet tall. Tubular or bell-shaped blossoms appear in hues like white, pink, peach, red, and purple.

Azaleas thrive in shade, and most will bloom in the middle of spring. These acid-loving plants do best in soil with a pH level from 4.5 to 6.0. Hardiness varies by species, but most azaleas will do well from zones 6b to 8a.

Azaleas are toxic to humans and animals and should not be grown where children or pets play unsupervised. Consumption can result in symptoms ranging from digestive upset to cardiac arrest. Consumption of azaleas can be fatal, especially for grazing animals like horses.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Azalea Flowers.

Beardtongue (Penstemon)

There are more than 250 species of beardtongue, producing flower spikes in colors like blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, and sometimes yellow. Plants bloom at the beginning of summer. Size varies quite a bit by species, with a range from six inches to eight feet tall and spreads from eight to 20 inches wide.

Grow this perennial in zones three through eight, in full sun (at least six hours of direct sunshine each day). Beardtongue does best in neutral to acidic soil that offers plenty of drainage.

bee balm flowers

Bee Balm (Monarda)

When in bloom in summer and fall, bee balm attracts all kinds of pollinators, from hummingbirds to butterflies and bees. After the flowers have faded, the seed heads will bring birds to visit your garden, too. The blossoms are made up of clusters of tubular petals and come in colors like pink, purple, red, and white.

Grow bee balm as a perennial in plant hardiness zones three to nine. You can grow bee balm either in full sun or partial sun. This plant thrives in loamy, moist soil that offers plenty of drainage. Mature dwarf plants can reach 10 to 15 inches tall, with a spread of 18 to 24 inches. Standard sized bee balm plants grow to between two and four feet tall, with a spread of three to four feet.

For more information, check out our article What You Need to Know About the Bee Balm Plant.

blazing star gayfeather

Blazing Star (Liatris spicata)

Blazing star is also known as gayfeather. The plants bloom from summer to the beginning of fall, with tiny star-like blossoms opening along the flower spikes. Purple blooms are most common, but you can also find plants with pink or white flowers.

Grow blazing star as a perennial in plant hardiness zones three through nine. Once plants are established, they grow to heights from two to four feet tall, with a spread of nine to 18 inches. Plant in full sun, in a spot where the soil is moderately moist but drains well.

For more information, check out our article Growing Blazing Star (Liatris) Flowers: A How To Guide.

butterfly bush

Butterfly Bush (Buddleja davidii)

Butterfly bush shrubs are high drama in the garden, reaching between three and 12 feet tall with a spread of three to eight feet. The flower spikes are heavy with small blossoms in blue, pink, purple, white, or yellow.

Grow this perennial shrub in plant hardiness zones five through nine. These plants do best in full sun with acidic or neutral soil that is moist but offers plenty of drainage.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Butterfly Bush (Buddleja davidii).

Calibrachoa flowers million bells

Calibrachoa

Calibrachoa also goes by the name million bells. There’s a huge array of colors to choose from, including blue, burgundy, coral, cream, lavender, orange, pink, purple, red, and yellow. Grow as a perennial in plant hardiness zones 9 to 11 or as an annual in other zones. Blossoms appear from spring to fall.

Mature plants grow to between six and 12 inches tall, with a spread of one to two feet. Plant in full sun or partial shade. Calibrachoa prefers rich, acidic soil with a pH range from 5.0 to 6.5 that provides plenty of drainage.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Calibrachoa.

canna lily flower blooming

Canna Lily

Canna lilies are real showstoppers in the garden, between their stunning height and florid tropical colors. Mature canna lilies can reach heights between one and a half and 10 feet tall, with a spread of between one and a half and six feet. Blooms open in summer in shades of orange, pink, red, and yellow.

Plant canna lilies in full sun. They do well with moist acidic or neutral soil in zones 6a to 10a.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Canna Lily Flowers.

Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Cardinal flower gets its name from the vibrant red hue of its petals. There are also pink and white versions available. Clusters of tube-shaped flowers adorn the cardinal flower’s vertical flower spikes. Blossoms appear from summer to the beginning of fall. Cardinal flower can grow to between three and four feet tall, with a spread of between one and two feet.

Gardeners in zones two through nine can grow cardinal flower as a perennial in full sun or partial sun. This plant prefers slightly acidic to neutral moist soil.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Lobelia Flowers.

catmint flowers

Catmint (Nepeta spp.)

Gardeners in zones four through eight can grow this repeat blooming perennial for pink, purple, or white blossoms in spring and summer. You’ll also enjoy the grayish green foliage. Established plants can reach heights between 10 and 24 inches, with a spread of one to two feet.

Plant in full sun or partial sun. Find catmint a spot in the garden that has soil that drains well. This deer-resistant plant is happy in acidic, neutral, or alkaline soil.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Catmint.

columbine flower

Columbine (Aquilegia spp.)

The showy, bright blooms of columbine resemble birds or butterflies with lots of folded wings. This perennial comes in lots of colors, including blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, and yellow. Columbines grow to reach between one foot and three feet tall, with a spread of one to two feet.

Gardeners in zones three through eight can grow columbine in full sun or partial sun. Plant in sandy or loamy soil that’s moist but offers good drainage. Columbine does best in neutral or slightly acidic soil.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Columbine Flower.

growing coral bells heuchera

Coral Bells (Heuchera)

Coral bells also goes by the names alumroot and rock geranium. Tall stems are topped with tiny bell-shaped flowers in orange, pink, red, or white that bloom through spring and summer. Some varieties have colorful foliage in shades like gold, lime green, purple, and rosy pink. Mature plants grow to between eight and 18 inches tall, with a spread of 12 to 24 inches.

Gardeners in zones four through nine can grow coral bells as a perennial in full sun or partial sun. Plant in acidic or neutral soil that’s rich and moist but offers good drainage.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Coral Bells (Alumroot, Heuchera).

daylillies

Daylily (Hemerocallis)

There are lots of daylily varieties to choose from, opening star-shaped lilies in colors like orange, pink, purple, red, and yellow. These flowers grow from six inches tall to five feet tall, with a spread of two to four feet.

Gardeners in zones three to 10 can grow daylilies as perennials in full sun. (The flowers will tolerate partial shade or lightly wooded areas.) For best results, grow daylilies in deep, fertile loamy soil. These versatile flowers will also tolerate light sandy soil or heavy clay.

Daylilies are toxic to cats and should not be grown where cats can access them. Consumption can cause symptoms ranging from vomiting to death.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Daylily Flowers.

Firecracker Plant (Cuphea ignea)

This plant also goes by the name of cigar plant or Mexican cigar plant. Its names refer to the shape and color of the blossoms, which are tubular and flame orange. Grow as a perennial in zones 10 through 12 and as an annual in other zones. Mature plants grow to between one and two feet wide, with a spread of two to three feet.

This versatile plant can be grown in full sun or partial sun, as well as in a variety of soil conditions. Soil can be acidic, neutral, or alkaline, and as long as it’s moist and provides good drainage, may be loam, clay, or sandy soil.

growing flower tobacco

Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana alata)

Flowering tobacco has fuzzy, sticky foliage and star-shaped blooms in summer and fall in colors like green, pink, red, white, and yellow. Grow as a perennial in zones 10 and 11. Plants reach three to five feet tall, with a spread of between one and two feet.

Flowering tobacco isn’t picky about soil as long as it’s moist and provides good drainage. The soil can be acidic, neutral, or alkaline. You can grow these flowers in full sun or partial sun.

Flowering tobacco is toxic to humans and animals, so do not grow where children or pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana alata).

Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)

Foxglove gives any garden an old-fashioned flair as well as a jolt of color. The tubular blooms are stacked on top of one another on flowering spikes. Blossoms can be pink, purple, red, white, or yellow, and they often have speckles inside. The flowering spikes can grow to heights between two and five feet tall, with a spread of one to two feet.

Gardeners in zones four through 10 can grow this perennial in full sun or partial sun. Foxgloves prefer loamy soil that drains well and is slightly acidic, with a pH level between 5.5 and 6.5.

Foxgloves are toxic to people and animals, so don’t grow them in gardens where children or pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Foxglove (Digitalis).

Hollyhocks (Alcea rosea)

These biennial flowers bloom in summer, with tall spires stacked with large, ruffly blooms in shades including lavender, pink, red, white, and yellow. They reach heights of six to eight feet tall, with a spread of one to two feet.

Grow hollyhocks in full sun where soil is moist and drains well. The soil can be acidic, neutral, or alkaline. Gardeners in zones two to 10 can grow these old-fashioned beauties.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Hollyhock (Alcea) Flowers.

hosta flowering

Hosta

Hostas also go by the name plantain lilies. These clump-forming perennial plants can grow to reach between six inches and four feet tall, with a spread of 10 inches to six feet wide. The foliage is its own attraction, with glossy green or variegated leaves. But in late spring and summer, hostas bloom in lavender, pink, or white.

Gardeners in zones three to nine can grow hostas in full or partial shade. Soil should be slightly acidic, with a pH level between 6.0 and 6.5. Soil should also be rich and fertile, at the same time providing plenty of drainage.

Hostas are toxic to dogs, cats, and horses, so don’t grow these plants where pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow, Plant, and Care For Hostas.

iris flower blooming

Iris (Iris germanica)

Bearded iris flowers appear in spring, in shades like blue, brown, orange, pink, purple, red, white, and yellow. Lots of varieties are bicolored. Mature plants grow to reach heights from 12 to 40 inches tall, with a spread of one to two feet.

Grow irises in full sun. Find irises a spot in the garden that has average soil that offers plenty of drainage. Irises can be grown in plant hardiness zones three through nine.

Irises are toxic to dogs and cats, so they should not be grown where pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow and Divide Bearded Iris.

lantana blooming in garden

Lantana (Lantana camara)

Lantana also goes by the name of shrub verbena, though it is not a true verbena. It can be grown as a perennial in zones seven through 11 and as an annual in other zones. As a perennial, lantana can grow to reach six feet high, with the same spread. The clusters of small, bright flowers are often bicolored and include shades like blue, orange, pink, red, white, and yellow.

Plant lantana in full sun where the soil offers plenty of drainage. For best results, grow lantana where the pH level of the soil is neutral, between 6.0 and 8.0.

Lantana is toxic to animals, so do not grow where pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Lantana.

blooming lilac flowers

Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)

Lilac bushes are stunning and, when in bloom in the spring, heady with fragrance from their purple or white clusters of blossoms. These shrubs can grow to heights between eight and 15 feet tall, with a spread of six to 12 feet.

Gardeners in zones three through seven can grow lilac in full sun. Choose a place that has loamy, well-draining soil to keep lilacs happy. They do best in soil with a neutral pH level.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Lilac Trees.

lungwort flower blooming

Lungwort (Pulmonaria)

Lungwort includes 18 different species of lowslung plants that burst into bloom in early spring with blossoms of blue, pink, and white. Most varieties begin with pink flowers that transform into violet as they mature. Plants grow to six to 12 inches tall, with a spread of 12 to 18 inches.

Plant lungwort in full or partial shade where soil is neutral or alkaline and moist with plenty of drainage. Grow this perennial in zones three through eight.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Pulmonaria (Lungwort) Flowers.

lupine blooming in garden

Lupine (Lupinus x hybridus)

Lupine comes in lots of colors, but the blue ones specifically also go by the name of bluebonnets. Other shades include pink, purple, red, yellow, and white. Some varieties are bicolored. Lupine can be grown as perennial in zones four through eight or as an annual in other zones. Mature plants grow to reach three to four feet tall, with a spread of one to one and a half feet.

Plant lupine in full sun where the soil is rich and moist, with plenty of drainage. Lupine does well in acidic or neutral soil.

Lupine is toxic both to humans and animals, so do not grow where children or pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Lupine Flowers (Lupinus).

morning glory flowers

Morning Glory (Ipomoea)

Morning glories are annual vines that grow quickly and, in summer and fall, are adorned with trumpet-shaped blooms in blue, pink, purple, or white. The flowers got their name because of how the flowers open early to greet the day and close once morning has passed. The vines stretch to heights between six and 10 feet tall, with a spread of three to six feet.

Gardeners in zones two through 11 can grow morning glories in full sun. Soil for morning glories can be neutral or acidic and should be moist with good drainage.

Morning glories are toxic to people and animals, so they should not be grown where children or pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Morning Glory Flowers.

growing petunias

Petunia

Petunias come in a dazzling array of colors and have gorgeous ruffly old-fashioned blossoms. You can find double blooms, bicolors, and flowers in shades including green, orange, pink, purple, red, white, and yellow. Mature plants grow to heights of six to 24 inches, with a spread of up to 36 inches.

Petunias can be grown as annuals in zones 10 and 11. Plant petunias in a spot that has acidic soil and gets full sun. The soil should also be moist, offering plenty of drainage.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Petunia Flowers.

Pincushion Flower (Scabiosa)

Pincushion flowers get their name from their appearance. Frilly petals encircle a center that really resembles a pincushion pricked with pins. Blossoms appear in summer and fall in shades of burgundy, cream, lavender, pink, red, and white. Pincushion flowers can grow up to 12 to 18 inches tall, with the same spread.

Plant pincushion flowers in full sun, in a spot with moist soil that provides plenty of drainage. Soil may be neutral or alkaline. Gardeners in zones three through seven can grow pincushion flower as a perennial, but it can be grown as an annual in other zones.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Pincushion Flower (Scabiosa atropurpurea & Scabiosa caucasica).

Pride of Madeira (Echium candicans)

Pride of Madeira produces purplish-blue blossoms from early spring through summer, blooming for several weeks. The shrub grows to between six and eight feet tall, with a spread of six to 10 feet.

Grow this perennial shrub in zones nine through 11. Plant pride of Madeira in full sun, in a spot where the soil is sandy loam that drains well. The soil can be acidic, neutral, or alkaline.

Pride of Madeira is toxic to people and animals, so do not grow where children or pets play unsupervised.

Red Hot Poker (Kniphofia)

Red hot poker plants are sometimes called torch lilies, although they are not a true lily. They also go by the names torch flower, African flame flower, and devil’s poker. The tall flowering spikes are stacked with tiny tubular blossoms in orange, red, and yellow. Mature red hot poker plants can reach three to four feet tall, with a spread of two to three feet.

Red hot poker plants are happy when planted in full sun. Choose a spot where soil is neutral (rather than acidic or alkaline) and drains well. Grow this perennial in zones five through nine.

snapdragons in garden

Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus)

Snapdragons are named for their snout-like shape and the snapping motion that occurs when pollinators visit the flower. They also go by the names dog’s mouth, lion’s mouth, and toad’s mouth. These classic additions to the garden start blooming at the bottom of the stalk and work their way up, so they have a long active blooming period from spring to fall. The summer heat can cause blossom production to slow down in midsummer. There are lots of sizes to choose from with the different varieties, with average measurements ranging from six to 48 inches wide and six to 12 inches across. The blossoms come in almost any color you can think of.

Plant snapdragons in full sun to partial shade. They do well where soil is slightly acidic to neutral, with a pH range between 6.2 and 7.0. Soil should also be rich and moist, offering plenty of drainage. Snapdragons are perennials in zones 7 through 11 but are grown elsewhere as annuals.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Snapdragons.

Soapwort (Saponaria officinalis)

Soapwort got its name because the roots and leaves can be used to make soap, but it’s also a beautiful way to attract hummingbirds. Soapwort also goes by the name bouncing-bet. Clusters of pink or white blooms give off a fragrance similar to cloves. Plants can reach one to three feet tall and one to two feet wide.

Plant soapwort in full sun to partial shade. It is grown as a perennial in zones three through nine. Soil should be neutral to acidic, with dry to moderate moisture and plenty of drainage.

Soapwort is toxic to people and animals, so don’t plant where children or pets will play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Soapwort.

sunflowers growing in garden

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus)

Tall, dramatic sunflowers will attract hummingbirds to your garden with their traditional yellow blossoms as well as options in mahogany or red. There are even bicolored choices available. These garden giants can reach three to 10 feet tall, with a spread of one and a half to three feet.

Grow these annuals in plant hardiness zones three through 11. Plant sunflowers in full sun where the soil drains well. Soil may be acidic, neutral, or alkaline.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow and Harvest Sunflowers.

Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans)

Trumpet creeper also goes by the names cow itch vine, hummingbird vine, and trumpet vine. Mature plants have vines that stretch from 25 to 40 feet long, with a spread of five to 10 feet. The vines are heavy with blaze orange trumpet-shaped blossoms, or red and yellow varieties are also available.

Trumpet creeper is a perennial in zones four through nine. Plant in either full sun or partial sun, in average soil that is moist but offers good drainage. Soil should be mildly acidic to mildly alkaline, with a pH level from 6.0 to 8.0.

Trumpet creeper is mildly toxic to people and animals, so it should not be grown where children or pets play unsupervised.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Trumpet Vine.

Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)

Trumpet honeysuckle also goes by the name of coral honeysuckle. Although common honeysuckle can be invasive, trumpet honeysuckle is not. The trumpet-shaped blooms open in spring and summer in shades of orange, pink, red, and yellow. The perennial vines can stretch up to 15 to 25 feet tall, with the same spread.

Grow trumpet honeysuckle in zones four through 11, in full or partial sun. Soil should be acidic or neutral and can be loam, sand, or clay, as long as it offers good drainage.

yarrow flowers

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow has lots of common names, so you may see it referred to as gordaldo, nosebleed plant, milfoil, poor man’s pepper, sanguinary, soldier’s woundwort, thousand-leaf, or thousand-seal. The foliage is aromatic and has an attractive lacy texture. Blossoms open in summer and fall with lots of tiny orange, pink, purple, red, white, or yellow flowers. Mature plants get up to between two and three feet tall, with the same spread.

Find yarrow a spot in full sun where the soil has a neutral pH level. The soil may be sandy, loam, or clay, as long as it offers plenty of drainage. Grow this perennial in plant hardiness zones three through nine.

For more information, check out our article Growing Achillea (Yarrow).

zinnia plant blooming

Zinnia (Zinnia elegans)

Zinnias are some of the easiest flowers to care for, and they can thrive in hot temperatures that scorch more delicate specimens. The best news is that the blossoms come in almost every imaginable shade. Mature plants can measure one to four feet tall, with a spread of 12 to 18 inches.

Zinnias love the sun, so find them a spot that gets at least six hours of direct sunlight each day. Soil should drain well and have a pH level from 5.5 to 7.5. Plant zinnias as perennials in zones nine through 11, or grow as annuals in zones two through eight.

For more information, check out our article How to Grow Zinnias.

More Tips for Attracting Hummingbirds to Your Garden

  • Don’t remove any spiderwebs you may come across in your garden if you want to attract hummingbirds. They use these silken fibers to build their nests.
  • While your instinct may be to pack flowers in close together, hummingbirds actually prefer plenty of space between blossoms. They need the room to hover and find their way from flower to flower.
  • Make sure to provide shaded areas to give hummingbirds a respite from the heat.
  • Water features, especially where water is in motion, give hummingbirds a great spot to take a quick bath. Turn a nozzle or sprinkler hose on a low, gentle setting to send up a cleansing spray.
  • Hummingbirds are attracted to color instead of fragrance, as their sense of smell is not strong. Their favorite color is red, and in addition to red flowers, you can include red on feeders, plant tags, and elsewhere around the garden to keep the tiny birds interested.

Now you know which flowers to include and how to set up your garden to attract hummingbirds and keep them coming back. Choose a few of the flowers on this list to cultivate, and before you know it your garden will be a hummingbird paradise.

Learn More About Flowers That Attract Hummingbirds

https://www.almanac.com/plants-attract-hummingbirds

https://www.birdsandblooms.com/birding/attracting-hummingbirds/top-10-colorful-flowers-hummingbirds-love/

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/plants-that-attract-hummingbirds/

https://www.countryliving.com/gardening/g32196978/flowers-that-attract-hummingbirds/

https://www.gardendesign.com/flowers/hummingbirds.html

https://www.thespruce.com/top-hummingbird-flowers-386271

The post 34 Flowers That Hummingbirds Love – Lots of Great Choices to Grow! appeared first on Gardening Channel.

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